Listen Up Dually Licensed Attorneys: An NYC Virtual Office May Be Up Your Alley

By Stephen Furnari - February 12, 2015
Listen Up Dually Licensed Attorneys: An NYC Virtual Office May Be Up Your Alley

Dual bar admissions doesn’t have to become a useless quality. Get the most financial profit out of it with an NYC Virtual Office.

When one thinks about it, it is an economically sound option to have dual bar admission, especially if your bar admission is in a neighboring state or where there are similar industries. If you do have dual admission, it’s about time you start thinking about an NYC virtual office to increase the financial reach of your firm.

All too often, additional bar admissions are either rarely acknowledged or not utilized at all. Many just do not know what to do with them and although it’s primarily for emergencies, it is not economically sound to not utilize it as fees to keep it continually take money out of your pocket.
License to to practice should be treated as a source of income and an NYC virtual office can be a great strategy for financial gain on your license.

What is a New York City virtual office?

NYC Virtual OfficeA New York City virtual office is a rental arrangement where attorneys can pay low monthly fee (typically starting at under $100 month) to rent the use of a commercial address and have access to office space and conference rooms on an as-needed basis. New York City virtual offices are frequently used by solo attorneys and small law firms who work from one place (out of town or from a home office) but want a premium commercial office address in a different location.

What can a New York City virtual office do for me?

Whether your practice is located in a neighboring state or across the country and you have the license to practice in New York, your NYC virtual office gives you the power to build repute and become a strong force in the New York City legal market. You no longer have to blame geography and can tap into opportunities and referrals that can be quite lucrative for your out-of-state practice.

Maybe it’s a waste of money?

NYC Virtual OfficeA New York city virtual office is only as good as the community provided, therefore, one must choose his or her provider carefully. A strong community of attorneys will ensure financial success as a necessary resource to your financial profits.

No Really. How does that help me?

Most attorneys are admitted in a single state, so your dual admission should give you an edge indefinitely. While those with singular admission are limited to one state, you have the chance to obtain even more exposure. Your firm in Connecticut has such close proximity to New York that an issue may arise involving New York City. Someone with single admission may need to:

1.  Obtain local counsel, or

2.  Refer the matter out entirely.

In terms of finances, the dually admitted attorney has the upper hand because they can handle the matter entirely without having to do any of the two options. With a well organized virtual office community, attorneys will be able to find money making opportunities within the network of virtual office clients.


Being dually licensed is a great way to obtain success. 

Learn more form our eBook “Virtual Lawyers Dish: Strategies For Success.”Virtual lawyers dish strategies for success

About Stephen Furnari

Stephen Furnari is a self-employed corporate attorney and the founder of Law Firm Suites, the operator of coworking spaces for law firms. Through Law Firm Suites, Furnari has helped hundreds of attorneys launch and grow successful law practices. He is the author of several eBooks, including “7 Deadly Mistakes that Prevent Law Practice Success” and “An Insider’s Guide to Renting the Perfect Law Office”. Stephen has been featured in the ABA Journal, Entrepreneur, New York Daily News and Crain’s New York. Connect with Stephen on Twitter (@stephenfurnari).

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